9/1/23

BAT MITIGATION GUIDELINES FOR IRELAND V2. IRISH WILDLIFE MANUALS, No. 134.


Executive Summary 

Bats and their roosts are protected by Irish and EU law. 

There are nine resident species of bats in Ireland, each with its own lifestyle and habitat requirements. They use a wide variety of roosts, including buildings of all sorts, trees and underground places. 

All nine bat species are protected under Annex IV of the Habitats Directive. One species, the lesser horseshoe bat, is also included on Annex II and Special Areas of Conservation have been designated to ensure the protection of its important breeding, roosting and foraging areas. 

Many bat roosts are used only seasonally as bats have different roosting requirements at different times of the year. During the summer, females of all species gather in colonies to give birth and rear their young; these maternity roosts are often in places warmed by the sun. During the winter bats hibernate, usually in places that are sheltered from extremes of temperature. 

When planning a development it is advisable to check for the presence of bats as early as possible so that any planning and licensing issues can be addressed before resources are committed. Bat surveys require specialist knowledge and equipment. 

Planning and licencing authorities are required to take account of the presence of protected species, including bats, when considering applications and may refuse applications on the grounds of adverse effects on these species or if an assessment of the impact of the development on protected species is inadequate. Conditions may be attached to the permission/licence to ensure that the conservation status of protected species is maintained. 

A grant of planning permission does not constitute a licence or permit to disturb bats or interfere with their breeding or resting places. 

A derogation licence (under the EC (Birds and Natural Habitats) Regulations 2011-2021) can permit actions affecting bats or their roosts that would normally be prohibited by law. Application for such a licence may be made to the Minister for Housing, Local Government and Heritage through the National Parks and Wildlife Service (NPWS) of the Department. The applicant must demonstrate that there is no satisfactory alternative, that the reason for the derogation is one of those listed in the legislation and that the action will not adversely affect the favourable conservation status of the bats. Each case is considered on its particular circumstances, and an application may be refused. 

Mitigation to reduce the impact of development is generally a condition of any licence issued. Mitigation measures will be proportionate to the impact and may require e.g. particular timing of operations, use of certain materials, and protection of existing roosts. Compensatory measures e.g. the creation of new roosts to replace ones being lost, may also be required. In some cases, a considerable period of time may be required to carry out this work. Follow up monitoring of the effectiveness of the measures is usually required. 

The protected species legislation applies independently of planning permission and other consents, so licences may be necessary for operations that affect bats but do not require other permissions. 

The Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage strongly advises developers to seek the services of a professional ecological consultant with appropriate knowledge, experience and expertise in assessing bat populations when contemplating a development proposal that may affect bats or their roosts. 

This document gives generic technical advice on assessing impacts and developing mitigation plans. It does not give a comprehensive explanation of the legislation or provide legal advice. 

 

  • Marnell, F. et al. (2022). Bat Mitigation Guidelines for Ireland v2. Irish Wildlife Manuals, No. 134. National Parks and Wildlife Service, Department of Housing, Local Government and Heritage, Ireland. [PDF]
 

9/12/22

A MANUAL FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF VERTEBRATE INVASIVE ALIEN SPECIES OF UNION CONCERN, INCORPORATING ANIMAL WELFARE

 

1.1. Project overview

This manual has been produced through the European Commission (EC) service contract ‘Identification, Assessment, Sharing and Dissemination of Best Practices for Humane Management of Invasive Alien Species’ (07.027746/2019/812504/SER/ENV.D.2.).

The aim of this project was to provide support for the management of vertebrate invasive alien species (vertebrate IAS), through lethal or non-lethal measures, including assessing their welfare implications, in order to strengthen the application of Regulation (EU) 1143/2014 on invasive alien species.

We have collected information on the feasible management measures for the 22 invasive alien vertebrate species of Union concern listed as of December 2021 (Box 1) with a view to eradicating, controlling and/or containing their populations in order to minimise their impact on biodiversity and related ecosystem services. These measures have been assessed in terms of their costs and effectiveness, welfare impacts (e.g. sparing any avoidable pain, distress or suffering) and other possible positive or negative side-effects (e.g. on other invasive alien species, on non-targeted native species, on the environment or on human health).

Through a series of online technical workshops (Table 1) and additional engagement activities these assessments have been reviewed by experts from a range of stakeholder groups across the European Union, including from national authorities, academia, NGOs and practitioners in the field. Through these engagement activities, legislation regarding the management of IAS of Union concern within Member States, and any restictions or bans on their application have also been identified.

The final ‘management measure assessments’ are presented in full in Appendices 1-32, and the information on legislation for each Member State can be found in the ‘regional conditions’ Appendices 34-41.
 

  • Smith et al. (2022). A manual for the management of vertebrate invasive alien species of Union concern, incorporating animal welfare. 1st Edition. Technical report prepared for the European Commission within the framework of the contract no. 07.027746/2019/812504/SER/ENV.D.2. [PDF]

1/12/22

DISTRIBUCIÓN Y ESTADO DE CONSERVACIÓN DE LA ICTIOFAUNA ARAGONESA

 
  • Abda, C. & Gines, E. (2020). Distribución y Estado de Conservación de la Ictiofauna Aragonesa. Consejo de Protección de la Naturaleza de Aragón, 98 pp. [PDF]

15/11/22

WILDLIFE AND POWER LINES. GUIDELINES FOR PREVENTING AND MITIGATING WILDLIFE MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH ELECTRICITY DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

Abstract

Given the vital role of power lines for social development, the rapid spread of such infrastructure worldwide and the fact that power lines can be one of the main causes of direct mortality for several species of birds and other wildlife, including mammals, it is essential to have suitable tools to ensure that these lines are built and maintained in accordance with environmentally friendly principles, and that priority is given to avoiding and reducing negative impacts. This manual is intended to be a technical guide for use by all stakeholders, from companies and businesses in the energy sector to authorities and government planners, investors and civil society. It contains recommendations and standard good practices for avoiding the adverse effects of new power lines and managing risks early in the process, so as to ensure that infrastructure expansion takes account of biodiversity in the spatial planning and early project implementation phases, when they will be most effective. It also contains case studies from around the globe.
 
  • Martín et al. (Eds.) (2022). Wildlife and Power Lines. Guidelines for Preventing and Mitigating Wildlife Mortality Associated with Electricity Distribution Networks. Gland, Switzerland, IUCN. [PDF]

10/11/22

LISTA DE LAS AVES DE ESPAÑA. EDICIÓN 2022

La Lista de las Aves de España 2022 contiene la relación actualizada y revisada de las especies de aves que oficialmente conforman el conjunto de la avifauna española, que ya alcanza las 638 especies y suma 19 incorporaciones, aunque tres especies salen de la lista.

Este listado supera en número al anterior, de 2019, gracias a la inclusión de 19 especies (13 de ellas observadas por primera vez, una más como especie exótica en vías de asentamiento y cinco debido a modificaciones en la taxonomía), mientras que tres especies han salido de la lista (el sinsonte tropical, la buscarla fluvial y el halcón tagarote, esta última por motivos taxonómicos). [...] Mas en Noticias SEO/BirdLife.

  • Rouco, M., et al. (2022). Lista de las aves de España. Edición de 2022. SEO/BirdLife. Madrid. [PDF]